Indian Brewery opens for craft beer and street food in Birmingham.



So many marvellous independent beer places have opened up over the last year in Birmingham, that now beer lovers are truly spoiled for choice.

The newest addition to the Jewellery quarter, Indian Brewery Snowhill, is set to spice things up a little which is great news for beer fans as well as street food lovers and artisan coffee folk.

The Indian Brewery has resurrected the old coffee shop, Brewsmiths under Snow Hill’s railway arches, and turned it as if by magic into a bar selling craft beer as well as artisan coffee.

Obviously being Indian you have to throw a bit of masala into the mix, so during the morning it dishes out an innovative breakfast menu and mouth watering street food from midday till late.

 Jaspal Purewal, who owns Indian Brewery which supplies Birmingham lager, Indian Summer, Bombay Honey, Peacock and IPA to Birmingham venues including Harvey Nichols, Connolly’s wine merchants and Indico, has taken over the lease of the cafe and had added an impressive bar. The old worn out exterior has been replaced by something altogether more slick and modern and the interior has a more industrial feel. 

It’s casual and relaxed with benches for drinkers to enjoy an artisan beverage whether it be coffee or Indian sodas as well as their beers, whilst admiring the classic Bollywood posters on the walls. A place of social gathering and good times.

 Jaspal told the Birmingham Mail: “We’ve wanted to set up a bar for our brewery for a long time and the Jewellery Quarter is the perfect location. There is so many exciting things happening here. This will be our flagship store – for all to consume our beers along with in-house artisan coffee and street food.”

The site on Livery Street opened on Friday 13th.

Beer is served in craft cans, bottle cask and on draught these include Indian Brewery beers and also an impressive range of guests.; The Indian Brewery beer is brewed at their Great Barr base.

The food has good options for Vegetarians and is a bright light in a gloomy slate grey January. Split into two areas Streetfood and Breakfast, 

For Streetfood veggies try: 

Chaat Bomb: veggie Gilles triangles, chickpeas, yoghurt, chutney and onion.

Delhi Paneer: Paneer cheese with spices, peppers, lettuce and yoghurt.

Fat Naans: veggie delight of potato, cauliflower, onions, chutney, mint, yoghurt and Bombay sprinkle.

For the Breakfast menu: 

Amritsari Kulcha: stuffed flatbread, accompanied by a side of seasoned yoghurt, chutney, onions, chickpeas and fresh lime pickle. 

Egg Naan

Posh Avocado: Brown bloomer with avocado and poached egg. 

For vegans I’m sure the menu can be adapted if it isn’t already vegan friendly. Check before. 


 The food menu has a distinct street flavour but there is a difference! Jaspal revealed: “We’re not your typical Balti house or Indian pub, we’re truly different and being innovative was key, the public has spoken.”

For the drinks all bottles (Indian Brewery beer) and Birmingham Lager in a can and keg are veggie and vegan friendly. 

However, the cask ale isn’t  but other guest ales are. 

The Indian sodas are also ok.


Enough to brighten even the dullest of days. 

Indian Brewery Snow Hill, Livery Street, Birmingham B3 1EU

Officially open from Monday 15th January 2017.

Breakfast is available Monday to Friday from 7am to 12pm midday, Saturday from 8:00am to 12pm midday, and Sundays from 8.30pm to 12midday.

Street Food is available Monday to Thursday from 12pm midday to 9pm, Friday & Saturday from 12pm midday to 9:30pm and Sunday from 12pm midday to 8pm.

TO BOOK : 0121 296 9000 WEBSITE: http://www.indianbrewery.com

FOLLOW : Twitter @IndianBrewery Instagram: @IndianBrewery

LIKE : Facebook.com/indianbrewery

Looking forward to trying it out soon. 

Thanks for reading,

Andy 😊

All photos and information courtesy of Indian Brewery and Delicious PR. 

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The Warehouse Cafe, now with added Vegan friendly beer and wine. 


  

  
The Warehouse Cafe has always had a special place in my heart. For many years not long after I first became Vegetarian (27 years ago) I used to frequent it often with veggie friends. The veggie burger was a huge favourite as was the potato wedges and desserts which were back then vegan friendly. There weren’t many places to go, in the city centre it was the one and only! Over the years it’s changed hands a few times but has always stayed similar and offered deliciosly good value vegetarian and vegan food. Now things have changed, but for the better. 

Vegan friendly beers and wine are now more popular than ever. Look in the supermarket or good wine shop and you’ll see more available than ever before. 

This summer marks three years since The Warehouse Cafe reopened the doors to Birmingham’s original Vegetarian restaurant and cafe. 

After a successful application for an alcohol license a new drinks menu will be introduced over the next few weeks. 

In order to stick to a completely Vegan friendly range and keep the environmental impact to a minimum the real ale and craft beer will be supplied by local Birmingham brewers Two Towers

The beers on offer at The Warehouse are Complete Muppetry, Electric Ale, Hockley Gold, Bhacker Adams, and a special craft beer Come on Feel the Noize- in commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the Birmingham band Slade. 

The wines will be supplied from independent merchants Underwood Wines who are based in nearby Stratford-upon-Avon. 

Try the drinks with dishes such as Digbeth Daal, The Warehouse Burger, Refried Bean Quesadilla, Halloumi Fish and Chips or ancient grain risotto. 

I’m looking forward to giving the beers a run for their money and walking down memory lane again as i always do when I visit. 

   
   
   
    
    
   
 http://www.thewarehousecafe.com

http://www.underwoodwines.co.uk

http://twotowersbrewery.co.uk/

Thanks for reading, 

Andy😊

Thanks to Darren at Two Towers for the beer images and info re beers. 

What is Vegan Friendly? 

It is during the filtering process of wine or beer that the non-vegan and vegetarian part usually occurs. For beer this part of the process is usually only reserved for cask ales, where Brewers use finings to clear away excess yeast suspended in the beer. Finings are also used in the production of wine. Animal derived products include most commonly islinglass. A form of collagen obtained from raw fish bladders. Finings don’t remain in the finished product, but by using finings that are not animal derived, such as Irish miss it adheres to the core principles of veganism and vegetarianism.